Boomer and the Babe
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No Thank You or Kiss Off

“No Thank you or Kiss Off?”

Peters and Brown

Boomer and the Babe

We who write e-newsletters for the most part are doing so to disseminate what we hope is legitimate information. It is certainly the case that many of us are also trying to gain the attention of someone that is a potential customer for our service or product.

That being said, I also understand that we all get a shload of crap emails. The question is what you do with the emails you receive. Is it SPAM or is it possibly good stuff but just annoying due to its volume.

You may not realize it but when you get an email about a product or service, chances are good that it was sent via a legitimate email distribution service. As such those services are required to give you an “opt out” or “unsubscribe” option. We use those services for that very reason. We want you, the recipient, to have a choice.

Many of us (ourselves included) send several types of emails.

One is our newsletter. We send it to a list of people that we either know or are affiliated with via some group or organization we are a member of.

The second is a reminder and a heads up, if you will, about who is going to be a guest on The Boomer and the Babe Show.

This is how we keep people informed about what’s new and we hope interesting. Admittedly either of these could and oftentimes does include some type of information about what we are offering you to advertise on our show. But, by comparison to the content in the rest of the piece, that percentage is very small.

Remember, we all need to sell something to stay in business.

Your favorite TV shows have commercials, your newspaper has ads and yes, radio shows run spots for their customers. Do you stop watching, listening or reading because you don’t like the advertising? Probably not. You may feel like it, but you either change stations, ignore it, get a snack or go to the bathroom.

We who use email as a form of communication/advertising are sometimes pretty blatant and rude about the way we communicate that message. But for the rest of us that are trying to give good information, the advertising message is an “oh by the way if you happen to be interested” type of communication. I for one think those missives should be viewed differently.

Those of us that communicate via a legitimate newsletter or email flyer about our “breaking news” are no different than those that use press releases in newspapers or other media. We are just getting the info out there.

What does make us different is we don’t camouflage it. It is what it is. Use it or not. Take it or leave it.

If you use it or take it, great. It’s the “leave it” or “not” categories that I’m most concerned with. I am less upset that you choose not to continue receiving the information than I am with the method you go about taking that action.

As I said in the beginning, legitimate information purveyors use legitimate distribution services. Constant Contact is an example. These services offer you the option to “Opt Out” or “Unsubscribe”. They do that so you can protect yourself from unwanted solicitation. They make that option VERY VISIBLE at the top and bottom of the message. When you receive a piece of information that you don’t want then SIMPLY USE ONE OF THOSE OPTIONS.

It’s like saying “No Thank You.” Labeling it “SPAM” is the equivalent of “Kiss Off.”

When you label something as SPAM you set up a series of potential problems between the sender and the distributor, and could jeopardize an honest businessperson’s success. Too many SPAM reports and questions arise about the legitimacy of the sender and can cause an unwarranted suspension from the distribution service. In most cases that is just not necessary.

If the option is given to Unsubscribe then use that one. If that option is not available or doesn’t work then all bets are off.

So, for those that receive email solicitations or other missives you may not want, think about what you’re saying before you hit the SPAM button. How you would like to be told no? Is it “NO THANK YOU” or “Kiss Off”?